World Cup in Qatar: Panini expects bad sales

updated

Lousy businessQatar frustration instead of collecting fever – Panini pictures don’t sell well

The World Cup in Qatar doesn’t seem to be met with much enthusiasm among Panini fans. The publisher has already adjusted its sales expectations downwards compared to previous World Cup tournaments.

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Panini expects relatively poor business with the FIFA World Cup in Qatar.

Panini

“Compared to previous World Cup tournaments, we have adjusted our sales expectations downwards in advance,” Panini Verlag CEO Hermann Paul said.

Panini

The World Cup starts on November 20.

The World Cup starts on November 20.

Panini

It’s about it

  • The iconic Panini images are not selling well this year.

  • The publisher has already adjusted its sales expectations downwards compared to previous World Cup tournaments.

  • As host, Qatar has been criticized for its human rights record.

of Panini Collection Image Creator expects Qatar World Cup business to be significantly worse than previous tournaments. “Compared to previous World Cup tournaments, we have already lowered our sales expectations in advance,” Panini Verlag CEO Hermann Paul told the “Augsburger Allgemeine” (Wednesday edition). The main reason is the late timing.

“We knew in advance that this year’s World Cup would be held at the end of autumn, a rather inconvenient time of year in this country,” said Paul. “So no barbecues, no ‘cosy’ public viewing. And then there are other competitions like the Champions League that take place in that tight time frame.”

The World Cup starts on November 20. It is the first time that the World Cup will be held in an Arab country – and for the first time, not in the summer, but at the end of the year. In addition, Qatar as a host country has been criticized for its human rights record.

Exploited guest workers should be compensated

Human Rights Watch says FIFA has an obligation to take responsibility for workers involved in building infrastructure for the World Cup in Qatar. “At FIFA, you can’t just say: If the government doesn’t cooperate, we avoid responsibility,” said Wenzel Michalski, German director of human rights organization Editorial Network Germany (RND, Wednesday edition).

“It’s not just about the dead in the construction of the stadium, but overall in building the infrastructure for the World Cup,” Michalski said. “It’s not just a moral obligation, it’s a legal obligation. The employer must pay for the families of employees who have died or are now unable to work.”

The human rights organization, together with Amnesty International, is demanding a payment of around CHF 437 million. Qatar and Fifa are to pay for guest workers who were exploited or lost their lives on World Cup construction sites. The amount corresponds to the prize money for the 32 national teams participating in the World Cup.

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(AFP/Employment)

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