Wine tasting and food: 5 bad combinations

Some foods affect the taste of the wine, so it is better to avoid them at the wine tasting.

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Watch out for the aperitifWhat not to eat and drink before drinking wine

Delicious food and a glass of wine – for many, they go together. However, some foods can affect your taste buds, so you should avoid them before tasting the wine.

Winter is destined for wine tastings as a corporate event or a family event during the holidays. What often cannot be missed: (celebratory) food in advance or directly with the wine.

But: What do you do before or during a wine tasting foods can have a huge effect on how you perceive the taste of wine. Not useful unless you want to miss a detail.

onion and garlic

After all, onions and garlic are in almost every dish. However, both should be avoided before tasting the wine, as they leave an intense and long-lasting aftertaste. Onions especially in raw or pickled state – so it is better to leave out silver onions for winter fondue or raclette before tasting.

Onions and garlic have a lasting effect on your taste buds.

Onions and garlic have a lasting effect on your taste buds.

Pexels / Karolina Grabowska

Hol dir day Lifestyle-Push!

Cucumber

Are there pickles on the plate served with the wine tasting? Better keep your hands off it for now. Acidic pickled foods are known to tie up your taste buds for longer than you might like. Also, avoid salad dressings that contain a lot of vinegar.

If you’ve found your new favorite wine by comparing with others, you can choose these favorite snacks again. It goes perfectly with medium-bodied, fruit-type white wines, i.e. Silvaner or Sauvignon Blanc.

Cucumbers are actually a popular choice with wine, but they aren't great for comparing and tasting different varieties.

Cucumbers are actually a popular choice with wine, but they aren’t great for comparing and tasting different varieties.

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artichokes and asparagus

Also two popular aperitif ingredients: artichokes or asparagus. Artichokes contain cynarin, which makes anything you eat with them seem sweeter. The chlorophyll contained in asparagus gives the wine a metallic taste.

Coffee and some tea

At a wine tasting, you want to fully immerse yourself in all the flavors that appear and not miss any of them. Bitter substances are especially important. Coffee affects these bitter substances or makes you less sensitive to them for a short time.

Coffee to wake you up for a concentrated wine tasting?  D rather not.

Coffee to wake you up for a concentrated wine tasting? D rather not.

Pexels / Mikhail Nilov

You shouldn't miss a single note at a wine tasting.

You shouldn’t miss a single note at a wine tasting.

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At the same time, coffee intensifies the sweet tooth. It’s a shame if it unfairly influences your opinion of certain wines. Also, the acidity in wine cannot be properly assessed after caffeine ingestion, as the production of saliva is slowed down.

Are you more of a tea type anyway? Before tasting the wine, it is better to use teas that contain little or no tannin, so they do not have to steep for a long time. Drinking in general is of course allowed and even recommended during wine tasting. Soda it neutralizes the taste especially well between tasting two wines.

Brussels sprouts and broccoli

Foods containing sulfur and chlorophyll can make wine taste bland.

Foods containing sulfur and chlorophyll can make wine taste bland.

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If your work wine tasting event is accompanied by a Christmas meal, Brussels sprouts are earthy and slightly sulphurous – qualities that don’t go so well with wine. It will cancel out the flavor of the wine so it can taste very bland and bland. The same thing happens with cabbage and broccoli.

Do you have any other wine tasting tips? Share them with the community!

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